hairloss

Everyone loses hair. It is normal to lose about 50-100 hairs every day. If you see bald patches or lots of thinning, you may be experiencing hair loss. Typically, each time a normal hair follicle is shed, it is replaced by hair that is equal in size. Typically, each time a normal hair follicle is shed, it is replaced by hair that is equal in size. But in women with female-pattern hair loss, the new hair is finer and thinner -a more miniaturized version of itself. The hair follicles are shrinking and eventually they quit growing altogether.

Medical and Other Conditions
If hair follicles are uniform in size, or if the hair loss is sudden, it is likely to be caused by something other than heredity, like a medical condition.

There are a wide range of conditions that can bring on hair loss, with some of the most common being pregnancy, thyroid disorders, and anemia. Others include autoimmune diseases, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), and skin conditions such as psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis.

Other reasons for hair loss include extreme stress; physical trauma like surgery or intense illness; dramatic weight loss over a short period of time; and taking too much Vitamin A. And hair loss can occur a couple of weeks to six months after any of these experiences. Someone can have surgery and be just fine and then two weeks later their hair starts falling out. It can be very scary when it starts falling out in big clumps.

Easy Does It
Another way to damage hair is self-inflicted – hairstyles like cornrows or too-tight braids can cause hair loss called traction alopecia.

All of the things women do to manipulate their hair — dyes, chemical treatments, bad brushes, blow dryers, and flat irons — can result in damage and breakage. This includes brushing too much and towel drying aggressively when the hair is wet.